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Living Well with Diabetes

Diabetes is a chronic (long-lasting) health condition that affects how your body turns food into energy. Learn more about how someone with diabetes can improve their quality of life through a variety of healthy habits and services with this starter Qstream microlearning course.

Category: Health and Wellbeing

Industry: Healthcare

Questions: 5

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Living Well with Diabetes

Navigate through the Qstream questions below to preview. Each challenge is designed following Qstream’s best practices for maximum knowledge reinforcement and engagement. This Qstream is free for clients to use as a starting point.

1. Making Healthy Food Choices >
2. Diabetic Education and Support >
3. Physical Activity >
4. Medication Reminder Strategies >
5. Consequences of High Glucose Levels >

Follow the interactions on each screen to answer Qstream questions as a Participant.

A recent study shows that the average American eats out five times every week. With the convenience of food delivery services on the rise, this is expected to increase. Additionally, restaurant portions are a lot bigger than they used to be which can easily lead to overeating.

When eating out, tips to follow for healthy choices are which of the following?

Answer explanation:
Managing your blood sugar is the key to living well and eating well is the key to managing blood sugar. This means eating healthy foods in the right amounts at the right times so your blood sugar stays in your target range as much as possible.

When you plan ahead and know what you’re going to eat before you get to the restaurant, you are less likely to feel rushed or be tempted by less healthy choices. When ordering, substitute steamed veggies for high-calorie sides like fries.

Studies have shown that drinking a glass of water before a meal can help you eat less while eating half of the dish and having the rest boxed up for leftovers can also help against overeating.

While salads can seem like a healthy choice this can be deceptive. Often restaurant salads are loaded with less healthy items like creamy dressings, cheese, croutons, and bacon.

Work with your dietitian or diabetes educator to create a healthy eating plan, and check out the resources found on the CDC’s site for tips, strategies, and ideas to make it easier to eat well.

When you first learn that you have diabetes, you may not know where to begin. You may be wondering, “How do I check my blood sugar?” or “What can I eat?”

Which of the following is a service available to diabetics so that they can learn how to best care for themselves?

Answer explanation:
Diabetes Self-Management Education and Support (DSMES) services help people with diabetes learn how to take the best care of themselves. Ask your doctor for a referral to DSMES services to help you manage your diabetes.

Physical activity is very important for people with diabetes. Being active makes your body more sensitive to insulin (the hormone that allows cells in your body to use blood sugar for energy), which helps manage your diabetes. Physical activity also helps control blood sugar levels and lowers your risk of heart disease and nerve damage.

As a diabetic, how many minutes a week of moderate-intensity physical activity should you strive to complete?

Answer explanation:
Your goal should be 150 minutes per week of moderate-intensity physical activity. If you’re finding it difficult to set aside time for this activity, try to fit in at least 20-25 minutes of activity every day. Also, on two or more days a week, include activities that work all major muscle groups (legs, back, hips. chest, abdomen, arms, and shoulders).

Examples of moderate-intensity physical activities include:
• Doing housework
• Mowing the lawn
• Walking briskly
• Dancing
• Playing Sports
• Swimming
• Bicycling

These activities increase your heart rate, by working your large muscles and making you breathe harder, which are important goals for fitness. Find out more by reading the CDC’s tips for being active with diabetes.

Gina sometimes forgets to take her medicine. Strategies that could help her remember to take her medicine include which of the following?

Answer explanation:
You can help remember to take your medicines by using a watch alarm or associating it with another common activity (brewing coffee, washing teeth, etc.).

It’s easy to forget to take your medicines. Try different things until you find the approach that works best for you. Some people find a watch alarm helpful. Others can remember if the medicine is somewhere they can see it. If you live with someone, ask them to also help.

Hiding the medicines in separate containers or away from plain view is likely to make it more likely that you’ll forget your medicine!

Nancy has not been taking her medication regularly and her glucose control has recently deteriorated. Her doctor has advised her to resume taking her diabetes medicine. If she does so, and gets her diabetes under control, she is likely to prevent which of the following problems?

Answer explanation:
Uncontrolled high glucose levels can damage the eye leading to blindness. It can also result in kidney failure, and nerve damage. These problems are caused by changes in the blood vessels of the retina, nerves, and kidneys.

• People with diabetic eye damage may not notice changes to vision, so annual visits to the eye doctor are recommended to check. Diabetes eye damage can be prevented, and can also be treated if it develops and is detected.
• Diabetes nerve damage can result in symptoms of numbness and burning in the feet and predispose to amputation.
• Diabetes is the leading cause of kidney failure in the United States.
• Poor diabetes control does not lead to hair loss, early menopause, or breast cancer.

A recent study shows that the average American eats out five times every week. With the convenience of food delivery services on the rise, this is expected to increase. Additionally, restaurant portions are a lot bigger than they used to be which can easily lead to overeating.

When eating out, tips to follow for healthy choices are which of the following?

Answer explanation:
Managing your blood sugar is the key to living well and eating well is the key to managing blood sugar. This means eating healthy foods in the right amounts at the right times so your blood sugar stays in your target range as much as possible.

When you plan ahead and know what you’re going to eat before you get to the restaurant, you are less likely to feel rushed or be tempted by less healthy choices. When ordering, substitute steamed veggies for high-calorie sides like fries.

Studies have shown that drinking a glass of water before a meal can help you eat less while eating half of the dish and having the rest boxed up for leftovers can also help against overeating.

While salads can seem like a healthy choice this can be deceptive. Often restaurant salads are loaded with less healthy items like creamy dressings, cheese, croutons, and bacon.

Work with your dietitian or diabetes educator to create a healthy eating plan, and check out the resources found on the CDC’s site for tips, strategies, and ideas to make it easier to eat well.

When you first learn that you have diabetes, you may not know where to begin. You may be wondering, “How do I check my blood sugar?” or “What can I eat?”

Which of the following is a service available to diabetics so that they can learn how to best care for themselves?

Answer explanation:
Diabetes Self-Management Education and Support (DSMES) services help people with diabetes learn how to take the best care of themselves. Ask your doctor for a referral to DSMES services to help you manage your diabetes.

Physical activity is very important for people with diabetes. Being active makes your body more sensitive to insulin (the hormone that allows cells in your body to use blood sugar for energy), which helps manage your diabetes. Physical activity also helps control blood sugar levels and lowers your risk of heart disease and nerve damage.

As a diabetic, how many minutes a week of moderate-intensity physical activity should you strive to complete?

Answer explanation:
Your goal should be 150 minutes per week of moderate-intensity physical activity. If you’re finding it difficult to set aside time for this activity, try to fit in at least 20-25 minutes of activity every day. Also, on two or more days a week, include activities that work all major muscle groups (legs, back, hips. chest, abdomen, arms, and shoulders).

Examples of moderate-intensity physical activities include:
• Doing housework
• Mowing the lawn
• Walking briskly
• Dancing
• Playing Sports
• Swimming
• Bicycling

These activities increase your heart rate, by working your large muscles and making you breathe harder, which are important goals for fitness. Find out more by reading the CDC’s tips for being active with diabetes.

Gina sometimes forgets to take her medicine. Strategies that could help her remember to take her medicine include which of the following?

Answer explanation:
You can help remember to take your medicines by using a watch alarm or associating it with another common activity (brewing coffee, washing teeth, etc.).

It’s easy to forget to take your medicines. Try different things until you find the approach that works best for you. Some people find a watch alarm helpful. Others can remember if the medicine is somewhere they can see it. If you live with someone, ask them to also help.

Hiding the medicines in separate containers or away from plain view is likely to make it more likely that you’ll forget your medicine!

Nancy has not been taking her medication regularly and her glucose control has recently deteriorated. Her doctor has advised her to resume taking her diabetes medicine. If she does so, and gets her diabetes under control, she is likely to prevent which of the following problems?

Answer explanation:
Uncontrolled high glucose levels can damage the eye leading to blindness. It can also result in kidney failure, and nerve damage. These problems are caused by changes in the blood vessels of the retina, nerves, and kidneys.

• People with diabetic eye damage may not notice changes to vision, so annual visits to the eye doctor are recommended to check. Diabetes eye damage can be prevented, and can also be treated if it develops and is detected.
• Diabetes nerve damage can result in symptoms of numbness and burning in the feet and predispose to amputation.
• Diabetes is the leading cause of kidney failure in the United States.
• Poor diabetes control does not lead to hair loss, early menopause, or breast cancer.

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